Q & A

Chicken Questions (11)

Are roosters needed in order to get eggs?

No, each hen is hatched with a set number of eggs that she can produce through her lifetime and will lay eggs regardless if there is a rooster or not; they just will not be fertilized.

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Do chickens fly?

Domestic chickens are not capable of long distance flight, although lighter birds are generally capable of flying for short distances, such as over fences or into trees (where they would naturally roost). Chickens may occasionally fly briefly to explore their … Continue reading

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How many eggs will a hen lay in a week/year? When do they start to lay eggs?

A typical hen will start to lay eggs at about 6 months of age. The eggs will start out small, then get increasingly larger. During the first year of laying, the hen (if she is a good egg producer) will … Continue reading

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Can I use the chicken manure in my garden?

Chicken manure is high in nitrogen, so it is considered “hot”. It will need to be composted before putting it directly onto your garden. once it has broken down, it then becomes perfect food for the garden.

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How long do chickens live?

That depends on who you talk to–Most farmers who are in the egg producing business will say 2 years. Those who are in the meat producing business will say 6 months–Those who keep birds as pets (with names) or who … Continue reading

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What do chickens eat?

They will eat just about anything! There are commercial poultry foods available at local feed stores, or you can make your own mix. People feed chickens corn, oats, wheat, rye, soy, fresh greens from the garden (weeds as well), table … Continue reading

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Will having chickens in my backyard attract rodents?

It is food that attracts rodents, not the birds. If you have wild bird feeders in your back yard, you run the same risk. Keep all feed in metal garbage cans, with secure lids. Feed birds in small doses, so … Continue reading

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What do you do with chickens in the winter?

They can live quite happily, through the coldest winter, if they have an insulated coop or a light inside their coop. The smaller the coop, the easier it is for them to keep it warm. Birds can get frostbite. Birds … Continue reading

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Are chickens safe from cats and dogs?

The key to safe chickens is a sturdy, impenetrable coop. Raccoons should be more of a concern, they are such clever, determined critters. .Make sure the structure is secure (enclosed top, fencing buried below ground under the sides, secure latches … Continue reading

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Are chickens dirty animals? Do they smell?

That will depend on the caretaker. Just like any other pet or animal, they need care–cleaning out the dirty bedding in the coop, keeping it dry and having a clean/dry area of sand or dirt for the birds to take … Continue reading

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Do hens make a lot of noise?

Contrary to popular belief, a backyard hen is not a loud animal. In fact, hens make less noise than a barking dog or a typical song bird. Because hens are social animals, they will talk amongst themselves at a volume … Continue reading

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Chicken Keeping (5)

Do chickens require a lot of space?

Poultry Coops can fit into just about any size backyard. For 4 hens, a 3’x4′ Coop plus a “run” (a place for them to scratch around) that is roughly 3’x8′ is more than adequate. Most commercial birds are placed in … Continue reading

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What do chickens eat?

They will eat just about anything! There are commercial poultry foods available at local feed stores, or you can make your own mix. People feed chickens corn, oats, wheat, rye, soy, fresh greens from the garden (weeds as well), table … Continue reading

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Will having chickens in my backyard attract rodents?

It is food that attracts rodents, not the birds. If you have wild bird feeders in your back yard, you run the same risk. Keep all feed in metal garbage cans, with secure lids. Feed birds in small doses, so … Continue reading

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What do you do with chickens in the winter?

They can live quite happily, through the coldest winter, if they have an insulated coop or a light inside their coop. The smaller the coop, the easier it is for them to keep it warm. Birds can get frostbite. Birds … Continue reading

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Are chickens safe from cats and dogs?

The key to safe chickens is a sturdy, impenetrable coop. Raccoons should be more of a concern, they are such clever, determined critters. .Make sure the structure is secure (enclosed top, fencing buried below ground under the sides, secure latches … Continue reading

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FUD (8)

Will having chickens in my backyard attract rodents?

It is food that attracts rodents, not the birds. If you have wild bird feeders in your back yard, you run the same risk. Keep all feed in metal garbage cans, with secure lids. Feed birds in small doses, so … Continue reading

Permalink.

Are chickens dirty animals? Do they smell?

That will depend on the caretaker. Just like any other pet or animal, they need care–cleaning out the dirty bedding in the coop, keeping it dry and having a clean/dry area of sand or dirt for the birds to take … Continue reading

Permalink.

Do hens make a lot of noise?

Contrary to popular belief, a backyard hen is not a loud animal. In fact, hens make less noise than a barking dog or a typical song bird. Because hens are social animals, they will talk amongst themselves at a volume … Continue reading

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What is FUD?

FUD stands for Fear, uncertainty and doubt. It is a tactic used in sales, marketing, public relations, politics and propaganda.

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Myth: Chicken coops are smelly

As with domestic dogs and cats, a poorly maintained habitate has the potential to become odorous. In general, a hen is not inherently unsanitary or “smelly.” Often when someone refers to how poorly chickens smell, they are referencing the oder … Continue reading

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Myth: “You can’t eat the egg if it doesn’t come from a store”

Truth: Fresh eggs from a backyard are edible and far more nutritional than the conventional egg bought at the store. See the nutritional values below: 4-6 times more vitamin D 1/3 less cholesterol 1/4 less saturated fat 2/3 more vitamin … Continue reading

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Myth: Having hens is going to have a negative impact on sanitation.

Truth: A properly maintained coop will not have an odor. The composted manure is a beneficial fertilizer for the garden. Additionally, chickens can be fed kitchen scraps, even scraps that cannot be directly composted, therefore, decreasing municipal solid waste. In … Continue reading

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If people are allowed chickens, are they going to ask if they can have a horse next?

The proposed ordinance is to allow backyard hens and is not inclusive of any other additional animals.

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4 thoughts on “Q & A

    1. Profile photo of Keith ConleyKeith Conley

      @Bennie Sides

      I’m uncertain about who will actually process chickens for you, but you may try contacting some of the local farms, such as Green Cedars Farm. I know there are many others localally, but Green Cedars Farm is the only one I’ve had personal contact with and I know for a fact that they process chickens, I just don’t know if they process chickens from outside of their farm.

  1. Profile photo of Jamelynn McDonaldJamelynn McDonald

    I was wondering if there are laws prohibiting at home slaughter of birds. If so, are there any companies in the area where you can drop off live birds and pick them up cleaned/dressed etc. I remember when Grandmama would go out to the coop and “prepare” sunday dinner. I know its not a nice topic but was just wondering about the current laws?

  2. Profile photo of Keith ConleyKeith Conley

    There is nothing in the County ordinance prohibiting raising birds for meat and processing them yourself. We believe this was on purpose, though it wasn’t requested when we were working on getting the ordinance passed. No complaints from me though!

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